Tag: theology

  • The Last Superstition: A Grab-Bag of Objections

    The Last Superstition: A Grab-Bag of Objections

    Chapter 5: Universal acid Here Feser continues his earlier theme, listing more alleged problems caused by modernism. This is a grab-bag of philosophical problems, and while a lot of them are interesting in and of themselves, for the most part they have little or nothing to do with atheism — New or otherwise — and […]

  • The Last Superstition: Reasoning With Aquinas

    The Last Superstition: Reasoning With Aquinas

    Chapter 3: Aquinas’s logical reasoning Eventually, Feser settles down to tell us a bit about Aquinas. In particular, his method of reasoning: What Aquinas is doing can be understood by comparison with the sort of reasoning familiar from geometry and mathematics in general. Take the Pythagorean theorem, for example. Once you understand the axiomatic method, […]

  • The Last Superstition: Aristotelianism Recap

    The Last Superstition: Aristotelianism Recap

    Chapter 2: Aristotelianism recap As you may have noticed by how long that last post was, I can’t seem to go more than a few pages without stumbling on something illogical, or nonsensical, or just plain wrong. It’s not because I’m trying to be picky or combative; it’s just that I keep trying to apply […]

  • The Last Superstition: Aristotle’s Metaphysics

    The Last Superstition: Aristotle’s Metaphysics

    Chapter 2: Greeks Bearing Gifts, Aristotle’s metaphysics We now come to Aristotle, and one of Feser’s central points (emphasis in the original): How significant is Aristotle? Well, I wouldn’t want to exaggerate, so let me put it this way: Abandoning Aristotelianism, as the founders of modern philosophy did, was the single greatest mistake ever made […]

  • The Last Superstition: Toothpaste and Universal Concepts

    The Last Superstition: Toothpaste and Universal Concepts

    Chapter 2: Greeks Bearing Gifts, continued. Continuing his discussion of Platonic Forms, Feser introduces this example (bold added): [A] squirrel who likes to scamper up trees and gather nuts for the winter (or whatever) is going to be a more perfect approximation of the squirrel essence than one which, through habituation or genetic defect, prefers […]

  • The Last Superstition: Plato’s Forms

    The Last Superstition: Plato’s Forms

    Chapter 2: Greeks Bearing Gifts is a recap of the history of Greek philosophy that led to Thomas Aquinas, which he’ll talk about in chapter 3. This is, in my opinion, the best chapter in the book. I’ll skip over the first section, From Thales to Socrates because although it’s interesting, from a historical perspective, […]

  • The Last Superstition: Skip Ahead

    The Last Superstition: Skip Ahead

    Chapter 1 This chapter can safely be skipped. It’s equal parts complaining about The New Atheists and insulting them, making big claims, and giving Aristotle and Aquinas loving tongue-baths. He yearns for the good old days when people kept their atheism to themselves. In this introductory chapter, Feser makes a number of big promises for […]

  • The Last Superstition: Preface

    The Last Superstition: Preface

    I don’t remember where or how I ran across Edward Feser, a philosopher at Pasadena City College, but at some point I was told that he was a Serious Theologian, one of those people whose arguments atheists allegedly ignore. So I got his book The Last Superstition: A Refutation of the New Atheism at the […]

  • An Ultimate Cause

    I’ve run into the cosmological argument several times lately, probably due to the people I’ve been engaging with on Twitter. Roughly speaking, it goes something like this: Pretty much everything we see around us was caused by something else. If you follow the causal chain backward, you’ll eventually wind up with something that doesn’t itself […]

  • It’s Too Soon to Ask for Evidence, and What Is Evidence, Anyway?

    Let’s take a peek over at Eve Keneinan’s post Keeping Track, which recounts a Twitter discussion between her, @MrOzAtheist, and Mark Houlsby, about Houlsby’s assertion that There is no evidence for God. Therefore God does not exist. Here’s a representative excerpt from Keneinan’s recap/rebuttal: But evidence is an epistemological concept, pertaining to knowledge, to how […]